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This Listing has ended

Item Title:

007 James Bond CuffLinks Diamonds Are Forever Secret Agent Service Fil



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Qty: 1 Current Time: 19 Feb 17 07:16:01
Offered By: rlhydra (0|2) 
Time & Date displayed is for United States - EDT
Start Price: £9.99   ($12.49) (no reserve)Learn More about Reserves & Starting Prices Auction Length: Learn more about Instant Buy
Scheduled Close Date: 04 Aug 2016 17:26:18Learn More about closing times
Actual Close Date: 11 Jul 2016 16:16:36
Postage: FREE Bids Received: 0
Item Location : Salford
Seller Location: United Kingdom
Sell to: Worldwide

Condition: New
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Item Specifics
Make/Brand :007
Model :Cufflinks
Lot #  18504328

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Item Description     Click to enlarge image + Click to enlarge
James Bond 007
Cufflinks
 
A Pair 007 Metal Cuff Links with James Bond Logo
 
Classy Stylish. A Must for all James Bonds Wanna bes...Shaken not Stired!
 
If these are for a christmas present or birthday gift. I have a Gift Box for these cuff links on ebay >>> Check out my other items!
 
In Excellent Condition
 
Starting at a Penny...With No Reserve..If your the only bidder you win it for 1p....Grab a Bargain!!!!
Would make an Excellent Gift or Collectable Keepsake for any James Bond Fan

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James Bond, code name 007, is a fictional character created in 1953 by writer Ian Fleming, who featured him in twelve novels and two short story collections. There have been six other authors who wrote authorised Bond novels or novelizations after Fleming's death in 1964: Kingsley Amis, Christopher Wood, John Gardner, Raymond Benson, Sebastian Faulks and Jeffery Deaver; a new novel, written by William Boyd, is planned for release in 2013.[1] Additionally, Charlie Higson wrote a series on a young James Bond and Kate Westbrook wrote three novels based on the diaries of a recurring series character, Moneypenny.
The fictional British Secret Service agent has also been adapted for television, radio, comic strip and video game formats as well as being used in the longest continually running and the second-highest grossing film franchise to date, which started in 1962 with Dr. No, starring Sean Connery as Bond. As of 2012, there have been twenty three films in the Eon Productions series. The most recent Bond film, Skyfall, stars Daniel Craig in his third portrayal of Bond: he is the sixth actor to play Bond in the Eon series. There have also been two independent productions of Bond films, Casino Royale, a 1967 spoof, and Never Say Never Again, a 1983 remake of an earlier Eon-produced film, Thunderball.
The films are renowned for a number of features, including the musical accompaniment, with the theme songs to the films having picked up Academy Award nominations on several occasions. Other important elements which run through most of the films include Bond's cars, his guns and the gadgets he is supplied with by Q Branch.
First appearance Casino Royale, 1953 novel
Last appearance Carte Blanche, 2011 novel
Created by Ian Fleming
Portrayed by 
Barry Nelson (1954)
Sean Connery (1962–1971 & 1983)
David Niven (1967)
George Lazenby (1969)
Christopher Cazenove (1973)
Roger Moore (1973–1985)
Timothy Dalton (1986–1993)
Pierce Brosnan (1995–2002)
Daniel Craig (2006–present)
Voiced by 
Bob Holness (1956)
George Baker (1969)
Michael Jayston (1990)
Toby Stephens (2008–2012)
Information
Gender Male
Occupation 00 Agent
Title Commander (Royal Naval Reserve)
Family Andrew Bond (Father)
Monique Delacroix Bond (Mother)
Spouse(s) Teresa di Vicenzo (widowed)
Kissy Suzuki (invalid)
Harriett Horner (invalid)
Children James Suzuki Bond (son with Kissy)
Relatives Charmian Bond (Aunt)
Max Bond (Uncle)
Nationality British
Ian Fleming novels

Goldeneye, in Jamaica, where Fleming wrote all the Bond novels.[14]
Whilst serving in the Naval Intelligence Division, Fleming had planned to become an author[15] and had told a friend, "I am going to write the spy story to end all spy stories."[5] On 17 February 1952, he began writing his first James Bond novel, Casino Royale at his Goldeneye estate in Jamaica,[16] where he wrote all his Bond novels, during the months of January and February each year.[17] He started the story shortly before his wedding to his pregnant girlfriend, Ann Charteris, in order to distract himself from his forthcoming nuptials.[18]
After completing the manuscript for Casino Royale, Fleming showed the manuscript to his friend (and later editor) William Plomer to read. Plomer liked it and submitted it to the publishers, Jonathan Cape, who did not like it as much. Cape finally published it in 1953 on the recommendation of Fleming's older brother Peter, an established travel writer.[17] Between 1953 and 1966, two years after his death, twelve novels and two short-story collections were published, with the last two books – The Man with the Golden Gun and Octopussy and The Living Daylights – published posthumously.[19] All the books were published in the UK through Jonathan Cape.
1953 Casino Royale[20]
1954 Live and Let Die[21]
1955 Moonraker[22]
1956 Diamonds Are Forever[23]
1957 From Russia, with Love[24]
1958 Dr. No[25]
1959 Goldfinger[26]
1960 For Your Eyes Only[27] (short stories)
1961 Thunderball[28]
1962 The Spy Who Loved Me[29]
1963 On Her Majesty's Secret Service[30]
1964 You Only Live Twice[31]
1965 The Man with the Golden Gun[32]
1966 Octopussy and The Living Daylights[33] (short stories)
Post-Fleming novels
After Fleming's death a continuation novel, Colonel Sun, was written by Kingsley Amis (as Robert Markham) and published in 1968.[34] Amis had already written a literary study of Fleming's Bond novels in his 1965 work The James Bond Dossier.[35] Although novelizations of two of the Eon Productions Bond films appeared in print, James Bond, The Spy Who Loved Me and James Bond and Moonraker, both written by screenwriter Christopher Wood,[36] the series of novels did not continue until the 1980s. In 1981, thriller writer John Gardner picked up the series with Licence Renewed.[37] Gardner went on to write sixteen Bond books in total; two of the books he wrote – Licence to Kill and GoldenEye – were novelizations of Eon Productions films of the same name. Gardner moved the Bond series into the 1980s, although he retained the ages of the characters as they were when Fleming had left them.[38] In 1996, Gardner retired from writing James Bond books due to ill health.[39]
1981 Licence Renewed[40]
1982 For Special Services[41]
1983 Icebreaker[42]
1984 Role of Honour[43]
1986 Nobody Lives for Ever[44]
1987 No Deals, Mr. Bond[45]
1988 Scorpius[46]
1989 Win, Lose or Die[47]
1989 Licence to Kill[36] (novelization)
1990 Brokenclaw[48]
1991 The Man from Barbarossa[49]
1992 Death is Forever[50]
1993 Never Send Flowers[51]
1994 SeaFire[52]
1995 GoldenEye[36] (novelization)
1996 COLD[53]
In 1996, American author Raymond Benson became the author of the Bond novels. Benson had previously been the author of The James Bond Bedside Companion, first published in 1984.[54] By the time he moved on to other, non-Bond related projects in 2002, Benson had written six Bond novels, three novelizations and three short stories.[55]
1997 "Blast From the Past"[56] (short story)
1997 Zero Minus Ten[57]
1997 Tomorrow Never Dies[36] (novelization)
1998 The Facts of Death[58]
1999 "Midsummer Night's Doom"[59] (short story)
1999 "Live at Five"[60] (short story)
1999 The World Is Not Enough[36] (novelization)
1999 High Time to Kill[61]
2000 DoubleShot[62]
2001 Never Dream of Dying[63]
2002 The Man with the Red Tattoo[64]
2002 Die Another Day[36] (novelization)
After a gap of six years, Sebastian Faulks was commissioned by Ian Fleming Publications to write a new Bond novel, which was released on 28 May 2008, the 100th anniversary of Ian Fleming's birth.[65] The book—titled Devil May Care—was published in the UK by Penguin Books and by Doubleday in the US.[66] American writer Jeffery Deaver was then commissioned by Ian Fleming Publications to produce Carte Blanche, which was published on 26 May 2011.[67] The book updated Bond into a post 9/11 agency, independent of MI5 or MI6.[68]
Young Bond
Main article: Young Bond
The Young Bond series of novels was started by Charlie Higson[69] and, between 2005 and 2009, five novels and one short story were published.[70] The first Young Bond novel, SilverFin was also adapted and released as a graphic novel on 2 October 2008 by Puffin Books.[71]
2005 SilverFin[72]
2006 Blood Fever[73]
2007 Double or Die[74]
2007 Hurricane Gold[75]
2008 By Royal Command[76] & SilverFin[77] (graphic novel)
2009 "A Hard Man to Kill"[78] (short story)
The Moneypenny Diaries
The Moneypenny Diaries are a trilogy of novels chronicling the life of Miss Moneypenny, M's personal secretary. The novels are penned by Samantha Weinberg under the pseudonym Kate Westbrook, who is depicted as the book's "editor".[79] The first instalment of the trilogy, subtitled Guardian Angel, was released on 10 October 2005 in the UK.[80] A second volume, subtitled Secret Servant was released on 2 November 2006 in the UK, published by John Murray.[81] A third volume, subtitled Final Fling was released on 1 May 2008.[82]
2005 The Moneypenny Diaries: Guardian Angel[83]
2006 Secret Servant: The Moneypenny Diaries[84]
2008 The Moneypenny Diaries: Final Fling[85]
Adaptations
Television
In 1954 CBS paid Ian Fleming $1,000 ($8,654 in 2012 dollars[86]) to adapt his novel Casino Royale into a one-hour television adventure as part of its Climax! series.[87] The episode aired live on 21 October 1954 and starred Barry Nelson as "Card Sense" James 'Jimmy' Bond and Peter Lorre as Le Chiffre.[88] The novel was adapted for American audiences to show Bond as an American agent working for "Combined Intelligence", while the character Felix Leiter—American in the novel—became British onscreen and was renamed "Clarence Leiter".[89]
In 1973 a BBC documentary Omnibus: The British Hero featured Christopher Cazenove playing a number of such title characters (e.g. Richard Hannay and Bulldog Drummond). The documentary included James Bond in dramatised scenes from Goldfinger—notably featuring 007 being threatened with the novel's circular saw, rather than the film's laser beam—and Diamonds Are Forever.[90] In 1991 a TV cartoon series James Bond Jr. was produced with Corey Burton in the role of Bond's nephew, also called James Bond.[91]
Radio
In 1956, the novel Moonraker was adapted for broadcast on South African radio, with Bob Holness providing the voice of Bond.[92] According to The Independent, "listeners across the Union thrilled to Bob's cultured tones as he defeated evil master criminals in search of world domination".[93]
The BBC have adapted four of the Fleming novels for broadcast: in 1990, You Only Live Twice was adapted into a 90 minute radio play for BBC Radio 4 with Michael Jayston playing James Bond. The production was repeated a number of times between 2008 and 2011.[94] On 24 May 2008, BBC Radio 4 broadcast an adaptation of Dr. No. Actor Toby Stephens, who played Bond villain Gustav Graves in the Eon Productions version of Die Another Day, played James Bond, while Dr. No was played by David Suchet.[95] Following the success of Dr. No, a second Bond story was adapted and on 3 April 2010, BBC Radio 4 broadcast Goldfinger with Toby Stephens again playing Bond.[96] Sir Ian McKellen was Goldfinger and Stephens' Die Another Day co-star Rosamund Pike played Pussy Galore. The play was adapted from Fleming's novel by Archie Scottney and was directed by Martin Jarvis.[97] In 2012, the novel From Russia, with Love was dramatized for Radio 4; it featured a full cast starring Toby Stephens as James Bond.[98]
Comics medium
Main articles: James Bond (comic strip) and James Bond comic books

John McLusky's rendition of James Bond.
In 1957, the Daily Express approached Ian Fleming to adapt his stories into comic strips, offering him £1,500 per novel and a share of takings from syndication.[99] After initial reluctance, Fleming, who felt the strips would lack the quality of his writing, agreed.[100] To aid the Daily Express in illustrating Bond, Fleming commissioned an artist to create a sketch of how he believed James Bond looked. The illustrator, John McLusky, however, felt that Fleming's 007 looked too "outdated" and "pre-war" and changed Bond to give him a more masculine look.[101] The first strip, Casino Royale was published from 7 July 1958 to 13 December 1958[102] and was written by Anthony Hern and illustrated by John McLusky.[103]
Most of the Bond novels and short stories have since been adapted for illustration, as well as Kingsley Amis's Colonel Sun; the works were written by Henry Gammidge or Jim Lawrence with Yaroslav Horak replacing McClusky as artist in 1966.[102] After the Fleming and Amis material had been adapted, original stories were produced, continuing in the Daily Express and Sunday Express until May 1977.[101]
Several comic book adaptations of the James Bond films have been published through the years: at the time of Dr. No's release in October 1962, a comic book adaptation of the screenplay, written by Norman J. Nodel, was published in Britain as part of the Classics Illustrated anthology series.[104] It was later reprinted in the United States by DC Comics as part of its Showcase anthology series, in January 1963. This was the first American comic book appearance of James Bond and is noteworthy for being a relatively rare example of a British comic being reprinted in a fairly high-profile American comic. It was also one of the earliest comics to be censored on racial grounds (some skin tones and dialogue were changed for the American market).[105][104]
With the release of the 1981 film For Your Eyes Only, Marvel Comics published a two-issue comic book adaptation of the film.[106][107] When Octopussy was released in the cinemas in 1983, Marvel published an accompanying comic;[104] Eclipse also produced a one-off comic for Licence to Kill, although Timothy Dalton refused to allow his likeness to be used.[108] New Bond stories were also drawn up and published from 1989 onwards through Marvel, Eclipse Comics and Dark Horse Comics.[104][107]
Films
Main article: James Bond in film
The Eon Productions films
In 1962 Eon Productions, the company of Canadian Harry Saltzman and American Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli released the first cinema adaptation of an Ian Fleming novel, Dr. No, featuring Sean Connery as 007.[109] Connery starred in a further four films before leaving the role after You Only Live Twice,[110] which was taken up by George Lazenby for On Her Majesty's Secret Service.[111] Lazenby left the role after just one appearance and Connery was tempted back for his last Eon-produced film Diamonds Are Forever.[112]
In 1973, Roger Moore was appointed to the role of 007 for Live and Let Die and played Bond a further six times over twelve years before being replaced by Timothy Dalton for two films. After a six year hiatus, during which a legal wrangle threatened Eon's productions of the Bond films,[113] Irish actor Pierce Brosnan was cast as Bond in GoldenEye, released in 1995; he remained in the role for a total of four films, before leaving in 2002. In 2006, Daniel Craig was given the role of Bond for Casino Royale, which rebooted the franchise.[114] The twenty-third Eon produced film, Skyfall, was released on 26 October 2012.[115] The Eon Productions series has grossed $4,910,000,000 (over $12,360,000,000 when adjusted for inflation) worldwide, making it the second highest grossing film series, behind Harry Potter.[116]
Title Year Actor Director
Dr. No 1962 Sean Connery Terence Young
From Russia with Love 1963
Goldfinger 1964 Guy Hamilton
Thunderball 1965 Terence Young
You Only Live Twice 1967 Lewis Gilbert
On Her Majesty's Secret Service 1969 George Lazenby Peter R. Hunt
Diamonds Are Forever 1971 Sean Connery Guy Hamilton
Live and Let Die 1973 Roger Moore
The Man with the Golden Gun 1974
The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 Lewis Gilbert
Moonraker 1979
For Your Eyes Only 1981 John Glen
Octopussy 1983
A View to a Kill 1985
The Living Daylights 1987 Timothy Dalton
Licence to Kill 1989
GoldenEye 1995 Pierce Brosnan Martin Campbell
Tomorrow Never Dies 1997 Roger Spottiswoode
The World Is Not Enough 1999 Michael Apted
Die Another Day 2002 Lee Tamahori
Casino Royale 2006 Daniel Craig Martin Campbell
Quantum of Solace 2008 Marc Forster
Skyfall 2012 Sam Mendes
Non-Eon films
In 1967, Casino Royale was adapted into a parody Bond film starring David Niven as Sir James Bond and Ursula Andress as Vesper Lynd. David Niven had been Ian Fleming's preference for the part of James Bond.[117] The result of a court case in the High Court in London in 1963 allowed Kevin McClory to produce a remake of Thunderball titled Never Say Never Again in 1983.[118] The film, starring Sean Connery as Bond, was not part of the Eon series of Bond films. In 1997 the Sony Corporation acquired all or some of McClory's rights in an undisclosed deal,[118] which were then subsequently acquired by MGM, whilst on 4 December 1997, MGM announced that the company had purchased the rights to Never Say Never Again from Schwartzman's company Taliafilm.[119] Eon now currently (as of 2012) holds the full adaptation rights to all of Fleming's Bond novels.[118][120]
Title Year Actor Director
Casino Royale 1967 David Niven Ken Hughes
John Huston
Joseph McGrath
Robert Parrish
Val Guest
Richard Talmadge
Never Say Never Again 1983 Sean Connery Irvin Kershner
Music
Main article: James Bond music
“ ... cocky, swaggering, confident, dark, dangerous, suggestive, sexy, unstoppable. ”
—David Arnold, on the "James Bond Theme"[121]
The "James Bond Theme" was written by Monty Norman and was first orchestrated by the John Barry Orchestra for 1962's Dr. No, although the actual authorship of the music has been a matter of controversy for many years.[122] In 2001, Norman won £30,000 in libel damages from the The Sunday Times newspaper, which suggested that Barry was entirely responsible for the composition.[123] The theme, as written by Norman and arranged by Barry, was described by another Bond film composer, David Arnold, as "bebop-swing vibe coupled with that vicious, dark, distorted electric guitar, definitely an instrument of rock 'n' roll ... it represented everything about the character you would want: It was cocky, swaggering, confident, dark, dangerous, suggestive, sexy, unstoppable. And he did it in two minutes."[121] Barry composed the scores for eleven Bond films[124] and had an uncredited contribution to Dr. No with his arrangement of the Bond Theme.[121]
A Bond film staple are the theme songs heard during their title sequences sung by well-known popular singers.[125] Several of the songs produced for the films have been nominated for Academy Awards for Original Song, including Paul McCartney's "Live and Let Die",[126] Carly Simon's "Nobody Does It Better"[127] and Sheena Easton's "For Your Eyes Only".[128] For the non-Eon produced Casino Royale, Burt Bacharach's score included "The Look of Love", which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song.[129]
Video games
Main article: James Bond (games)
In 1983, the first Bond video game, developed and published by Parker Brothers, was released for the Atari 2600, the Atari 5200, the Atari 800, the Commodore 64 and the ColecoVision.[130] Since then, there have been numerous video games either based on the films or using original storylines. In 1997, the first-person shooter video game GoldenEye 007 was developed by Rare for the Nintendo 64, based on the 1995 Pierce Brosnan film GoldenEye.[131] The game received very positive reviews,[132] won the BAFTA Interactive Entertainment Award for UK Developer of the Year in 1998[133] and sold over eight million copies worldwide,[134][135] grossing $250 million.[136]
In 1999, Electronic Arts acquired the licence and released Tomorrow Never Dies on 16 December 1999.[137] In October 2000, they released The World Is Not Enough[138] for the Nintendo 64[139] followed by007 Racing for the PlayStation on 21 November 2000.[140] In 2003, the company released Everything or Nothing,[141] which included the likenesses and voices of Pierce Brosnan, Willem Dafoe, Heidi Klum, Judi Dench and John Cleese, amongst others.[142] In November 2005, Electronic Arts released a video game adaptation of From Russia with Love,[143] which involved Sean Connery's image and voice-over for Bond.[143]
In 2006 Electronic Arts announced a game based on then-upcoming film Casino Royale: the game was cancelled because it would not be ready by the film's release in November of that year. With MGM losing revenue from lost licensing fees, the franchise was removed from EA to Activision.[144] Activision subsequently released the 007: Quantum of Solace game on 31 October 2008, based on the film of the same name.
Ian Fleming novels

Goldeneye, in Jamaica, where Fleming wrote all the Bond novels.[14]
Whilst serving in the Naval Intelligence Division, Fleming had planned to become an author[15] and had told a friend, "I am going to write the spy story to end all spy stories."[5] On 17 February 1952, he began writing his first James Bond novel, Casino Royale at his Goldeneye estate in Jamaica,[16] where he wrote all his Bond novels, during the months of January and February each year.[17] He started the story shortly before his wedding to his pregnant girlfriend, Ann Charteris, in order to distract himself from his forthcoming nuptials.[18]
After completing the manuscript for Casino Royale, Fleming showed the manuscript to his friend (and later editor) William Plomer to read. Plomer liked it and submitted it to the publishers, Jonathan Cape, who did not like it as much. Cape finally published it in 1953 on the recommendation of Fleming's older brother Peter, an established travel writer.[17] Between 1953 and 1966, two years after his death, twelve novels and two short-story collections were published, with the last two books – The Man with the Golden Gun and Octopussy and The Living Daylights – published posthumously.[19] All the books were published in the UK through Jonathan Cape.
1953 Casino Royale[20]
1954 Live and Let Die[21]
1955 Moonraker[22]
1956 Diamonds Are Forever[23]
1957 From Russia, with Love[24]
1958 Dr. No[25]
1959 Goldfinger[26]
1960 For Your Eyes Only[27] (short stories)
1961 Thunderball[28]
1962 The Spy Who Loved Me[29]
1963 On Her Majesty's Secret Service[30]
1964 You Only Live Twice[31]
1965 The Man with the Golden Gun[32]
1966 Octopussy and The Living Daylights[33] (short stories)
Post-Fleming novels
After Fleming's death a continuation novel, Colonel Sun, was written by Kingsley Amis (as Robert Markham) and published in 1968.[34] Amis had already written a literary study of Fleming's Bond novels in his 1965 work The James Bond Dossier.[35] Although novelizations of two of the Eon Productions Bond films appeared in print, James Bond, The Spy Who Loved Me and James Bond and Moonraker, both written by screenwriter Christopher Wood,[36] the series of novels did not continue until the 1980s. In 1981, thriller writer John Gardner picked up the series with Licence Renewed.[37] Gardner went on to write sixteen Bond books in total; two of the books he wrote – Licence to Kill and GoldenEye – were novelizations of Eon Productions films of the same name. Gardner moved the Bond series into the 1980s, although he retained the ages of the characters as they were when Fleming had left them.[38] In 1996, Gardner retired from writing James Bond books due to ill health.[39]
1981 Licence Renewed[40]
1982 For Special Services[41]
1983 Icebreaker[42]
1984 Role of Honour[43]
1986 Nobody Lives for Ever[44]
1987 No Deals, Mr. Bond[45]
1988 Scorpius[46]
1989 Win, Lose or Die[47]
1989 Licence to Kill[36] (novelization)
1990 Brokenclaw[48]
1991 The Man from Barbarossa[49]
1992 Death is Forever[50]
1993 Never Send Flowers[51]
1994 SeaFire[52]
1995 GoldenEye[36] (novelization)
1996 COLD[53]
In 1996, American author Raymond Benson became the author of the Bond novels. Benson had previously been the author of The James Bond Bedside Companion, first published in 1984.[54] By the time he moved on to other, non-Bond related projects in 2002, Benson had written six Bond novels, three novelizations and three short stories.[55]
1997 "Blast From the Past"[56] (short story)
1997 Zero Minus Ten[57]
1997 Tomorrow Never Dies[36] (novelization)
1998 The Facts of Death[58]
1999 "Midsummer Night's Doom"[59] (short story)
1999 "Live at Five"[60] (short story)
1999 The World Is Not Enough[36] (novelization)
1999 High Time to Kill[61]
2000 DoubleShot[62]
2001 Never Dream of Dying[63]
2002 The Man with the Red Tattoo[64]
2002 Die Another Day[36] (novelization)
After a gap of six years, Sebastian Faulks was commissioned by Ian Fleming Publications to write a new Bond novel, which was released on 28 May 2008, the 100th anniversary of Ian Fleming's birth.[65] The book—titled Devil May Care—was published in the UK by Penguin Books and by Doubleday in the US.[66] American writer Jeffery Deaver was then commissioned by Ian Fleming Publications to produce Carte Blanche, which was published on 26 May 2011.[67] The book updated Bond into a post 9/11 agency, independent of MI5 or MI6.[68]
Young Bond
Main article: Young Bond
The Young Bond series of novels was started by Charlie Higson[69] and, between 2005 and 2009, five novels and one short story were published.[70] The first Young Bond novel, SilverFin was also adapted and released as a graphic novel on 2 October 2008 by Puffin Books.[71]
2005 SilverFin[72]
2006 Blood Fever[73]
2007 Double or Die[74]
2007 Hurricane Gold[75]
2008 By Royal Command[76] & SilverFin[77] (graphic novel)
2009 "A Hard Man to Kill"[78] (short story)
The Moneypenny Diaries
The Moneypenny Diaries are a trilogy of novels chronicling the life of Miss Moneypenny, M's personal secretary. The novels are penned by Samantha Weinberg under the pseudonym Kate Westbrook, who is depicted as the book's "editor".[79] The first instalment of the trilogy, subtitled Guardian Angel, was released on 10 October 2005 in the UK.[80] A second volume, subtitled Secret Servant was released on 2 November 2006 in the UK, published by John Murray.[81] A third volume, subtitled Final Fling was released on 1 May 2008.[82]
2005 The Moneypenny Diaries: Guardian Angel[83]
2006 Secret Servant: The Moneypenny Diaries[84]
2008 The Moneypenny Diaries: Final Fling[85]
Adaptations
Television
In 1954 CBS paid Ian Fleming $1,000 ($8,654 in 2012 dollars[86]) to adapt his novel Casino Royale into a one-hour television adventure as part of its Climax! series.[87] The episode aired live on 21 October 1954 and starred Barry Nelson as "Card Sense" James 'Jimmy' Bond and Peter Lorre as Le Chiffre.[88] The novel was adapted for American audiences to show Bond as an American agent working for "Combined Intelligence", while the character Felix Leiter—American in the novel—became British onscreen and was renamed "Clarence Leiter".[89]
In 1973 a BBC documentary Omnibus: The British Hero featured Christopher Cazenove playing a number of such title characters (e.g. Richard Hannay and Bulldog Drummond). The documentary included James Bond in dramatised scenes from Goldfinger—notably featuring 007 being threatened with the novel's circular saw, rather than the film's laser beam—and Diamonds Are Forever.[90] In 1991 a TV cartoon series James Bond Jr. was produced with Corey Burton in the role of Bond's nephew, also called James Bond.[91]
Radio
In 1956, the novel Moonraker was adapted for broadcast on South African radio, with Bob Holness providing the voice of Bond.[92] According to The Independent, "listeners across the Union thrilled to Bob's cultured tones as he defeated evil master criminals in search of world domination".[93]
The BBC have adapted four of the Fleming novels for broadcast: in 1990, You Only Live Twice was adapted into a 90 minute radio play for BBC Radio 4 with Michael Jayston playing James Bond. The production was repeated a number of times between 2008 and 2011.[94] On 24 May 2008, BBC Radio 4 broadcast an adaptation of Dr. No. Actor Toby Stephens, who played Bond villain Gustav Graves in the Eon Productions version of Die Another Day, played James Bond, while Dr. No was played by David Suchet.[95] Following the success of Dr. No, a second Bond story was adapted and on 3 April 2010, BBC Radio 4 broadcast Goldfinger with Toby Stephens again playing Bond.[96] Sir Ian McKellen was Goldfinger and Stephens' Die Another Day co-star Rosamund Pike played Pussy Galore. The play was adapted from Fleming's novel by Archie Scottney and was directed by Martin Jarvis.[97] In 2012, the novel From Russia, with Love was dramatized for Radio 4; it featured a full cast starring Toby Stephens as James Bond.[98]
Comics medium
Main articles: James Bond (comic strip) and James Bond comic books

John McLusky's rendition of James Bond.
In 1957, the Daily Express approached Ian Fleming to adapt his stories into comic strips, offering him £1,500 per novel and a share of takings from syndication.[99] After initial reluctance, Fleming, who felt the strips would lack the quality of his writing, agreed.[100] To aid the Daily Express in illustrating Bond, Fleming commissioned an artist to create a sketch of how he believed James Bond looked. The illustrator, John McLusky, however, felt that Fleming's 007 looked too "outdated" and "pre-war" and changed Bond to give him a more masculine look.[101] The first strip, Casino Royale was published from 7 July 1958 to 13 December 1958[102] and was written by Anthony Hern and illustrated by John McLusky.[103]
Most of the Bond novels and short stories have since been adapted for illustration, as well as Kingsley Amis's Colonel Sun; the works were written by Henry Gammidge or Jim Lawrence with Yaroslav Horak replacing McClusky as artist in 1966.[102] After the Fleming and Amis material had been adapted, original stories were produced, continuing in the Daily Express and Sunday Express until May 1977.[101]
Several comic book adaptations of the James Bond films have been published through the years: at the time of Dr. No's release in October 1962, a comic book adaptation of the screenplay, written by Norman J. Nodel, was published in Britain as part of the Classics Illustrated anthology series.[104] It was later reprinted in the United States by DC Comics as part of its Showcase anthology series, in January 1963. This was the first American comic book appearance of James Bond and is noteworthy for being a relatively rare example of a British comic being reprinted in a fairly high-profile American comic. It was also one of the earliest comics to be censored on racial grounds (some skin tones and dialogue were changed for the American market).[105][104]
With the release of the 1981 film For Your Eyes Only, Marvel Comics published a two-issue comic book adaptation of the film.[106][107] When Octopussy was released in the cinemas in 1983, Marvel published an accompanying comic;[104] Eclipse also produced a one-off comic for Licence to Kill, although Timothy Dalton refused to allow his likeness to be used.[108] New Bond stories were also drawn up and published from 1989 onwards through Marvel, Eclipse Comics and Dark Horse Comics.[104][107]
Films
Main article: James Bond in film
The Eon Productions films
In 1962 Eon Productions, the company of Canadian Harry Saltzman and American Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli released the first cinema adaptation of an Ian Fleming novel, Dr. No, featuring Sean Connery as 007.[109] Connery starred in a further four films before leaving the role after You Only Live Twice,[110] which was taken up by George Lazenby for On Her Majesty's Secret Service.[111] Lazenby left the role after just one appearance and Connery was tempted back for his last Eon-produced film Diamonds Are Forever.[112]
In 1973, Roger Moore was appointed to the role of 007 for Live and Let Die and played Bond a further six times over twelve years before being replaced by Timothy Dalton for two films. After a six year hiatus, during which a legal wrangle threatened Eon's productions of the Bond films,[113] Irish actor Pierce Brosnan was cast as Bond in GoldenEye, released in 1995; he remained in the role for a total of four films, before leaving in 2002. In 2006, Daniel Craig was given the role of Bond for Casino Royale, which rebooted the franchise.[114] The twenty-third Eon produced film, Skyfall, was released on 26 October 2012.[115] The Eon Productions series has grossed $4,910,000,000 (over $12,360,000,000 when adjusted for inflation) worldwide, making it the second highest grossing film series, behind Harry Potter.[116]
Title Year Actor Director
Dr. No 1962 Sean Connery Terence Young
From Russia with Love 1963
Goldfinger 1964 Guy Hamilton
Thunderball 1965 Terence Young
You Only Live Twice 1967 Lewis Gilbert
On Her Majesty's Secret Service 1969 George Lazenby Peter R. Hunt
Diamonds Are Forever 1971 Sean Connery Guy Hamilton
Live and Let Die 1973 Roger Moore
The Man with the Golden Gun 1974
The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 Lewis Gilbert
Moonraker 1979
For Your Eyes Only 1981 John Glen
Octopussy 1983
A View to a Kill 1985
The Living Daylights 1987 Timothy Dalton
Licence to Kill 1989
GoldenEye 1995 Pierce Brosnan Martin Campbell
Tomorrow Never Dies 1997 Roger Spottiswoode
The World Is Not Enough 1999 Michael Apted
Die Another Day 2002 Lee Tamahori
Casino Royale 2006 Daniel Craig Martin Campbell
Quantum of Solace 2008 Marc Forster
Skyfall 2012 Sam Mendes
Non-Eon films
In 1967, Casino Royale was adapted into a parody Bond film starring David Niven as Sir James Bond and Ursula Andress as Vesper Lynd. David Niven had been Ian Fleming's preference for the part of James Bond.[117] The result of a court case in the High Court in London in 1963 allowed Kevin McClory to produce a remake of Thunderball titled Never Say Never Again in 1983.[118] The film, starring Sean Connery as Bond, was not part of the Eon series of Bond films. In 1997 the Sony Corporation acquired all or some of McClory's rights in an undisclosed deal,[118] which were then subsequently acquired by MGM, whilst on 4 December 1997, MGM announced that the company had purchased the rights to Never Say Never Again from Schwartzman's company Taliafilm.[119] Eon now currently (as of 2012) holds the full adaptation rights to all of Fleming's Bond novels.[118][120]
Title Year Actor Director
Casino Royale 1967 David Niven Ken Hughes
John Huston
Joseph McGrath
Robert Parrish
Val Guest
Richard Talmadge
Never Say Never Again 1983 Sean Connery Irvin Kershner
Music
Main article: James Bond music
“ ... cocky, swaggering, confident, dark, dangerous, suggestive, sexy, unstoppable. ”
—David Arnold, on the "James Bond Theme"[121]
The "James Bond Theme" was written by Monty Norman and was first orchestrated by the John Barry Orchestra for 1962's Dr. No, although the actual authorship of the music has been a matter of controversy for many years.[122] In 2001, Norman won £30,000 in libel damages from the The Sunday Times newspaper, which suggested that Barry was entirely responsible for the composition.[123] The theme, as written by Norman and arranged by Barry, was described by another Bond film composer, David Arnold, as "bebop-swing vibe coupled with that vicious, dark, distorted electric guitar, definitely an instrument of rock 'n' roll ... it represented everything about the character you would want: It was cocky, swaggering, confident, dark, dangerous, suggestive, sexy, unstoppable. And he did it in two minutes."[121] Barry composed the scores for eleven Bond films[124] and had an uncredited contribution to Dr. No with his arrangement of the Bond Theme.[121]
A Bond film staple are the theme songs heard during their title sequences sung by well-known popular singers.[125] Several of the songs produced for the films have been nominated for Academy Awards for Original Song, including Paul McCartney's "Live and Let Die",[126] Carly Simon's "Nobody Does It Better"[127] and Sheena Easton's "For Your Eyes Only".[128] For the non-Eon produced Casino Royale, Burt Bacharach's score included "The Look of Love", which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song.[129]
Video games
Main article: James Bond (games)
In 1983, the first Bond video game, developed and published by Parker Brothers, was released for the Atari 2600, the Atari 5200, the Atari 800, the Commodore 64 and the ColecoVision.[130] Since then, there have been numerous video games either based on the films or using original storylines. In 1997, the first-person shooter video game GoldenEye 007 was developed by Rare for the Nintendo 64, based on the 1995 Pierce Brosnan film GoldenEye.[131] The game received very positive reviews,[132] won the BAFTA Interactive Entertainment Award for UK Developer of the Year in 1998[133] and sold over eight million copies worldwide,[134][135] grossing $250 million.[136]
In 1999, Electronic Arts acquired the licence and released Tomorrow Never Dies on 16 December 1999.[137] In October 2000, they released The World Is Not Enough[138] for the Nintendo 64[139] followed by007 Racing for the PlayStation on 21 November 2000.[140] In 2003, the company released Everything or Nothing,[141] which included the likenesses and voices of Pierce Brosnan, Willem Dafoe, Heidi Klum, Judi Dench and John Cleese, amongst others.[142] In November 2005, Electronic Arts released a video game adaptation of From Russia with Love,[143] which involved Sean Connery's image and voice-over for Bond.[143]
In 2006 Electronic Arts announced a game based on then-upcoming film Casino Royale: the game was cancelled because it would not be ready by the film's release in November of that year. With MGM losing revenue from lost licensing fees, the franchise was removed from EA to Activision.[144] Activision subsequently released the 007: Quantum of Solace game on 31 October 2008, based on the film of the same name.
Skyfall is the twenty-third spy film in the Eon Productions James Bond series, produced for MGM, Columbia Pictures and Sony Pictures Entertainment.[2] It features Daniel Craig's third performance as James Bond, and Javier Bardem as Raoul Silva, the film's villain. The film was directed by Sam Mendes and written by John Logan, Neal Purvis and Robert Wade.
Mendes was approached to direct the film following the release of Quantum of Solace in 2008. However, production was suspended when MGM encountered financial troubles, and would not resume until December 2010. During this time, Mendes remained attached to the project as a "consultant", though original screenwriter Peter Morgan left the project during the suspension. Once production resumed, Logan, Purvis and Wade continued writing what would be the final version of the script, incorporating Morgan's ideas in it. Filming began in November 2011, and primarily took place in the United Kingdom, China and Turkey.
Skyfall premiered on 23 October 2012,[3] and was released in the United Kingdom on 26 October 2012;[4] it is also the first James Bond film to be released in IMAX venues.[5][6] The film's release coincided with the 50th anniversary of the series, which began with Dr. No in 1962.
Directed by Sam Mendes
Produced by Michael G. Wilson
Barbara Broccoli
Written by John Logan
Neal Purvis
Robert Wade
Based on James Bond by
Ian Fleming
Starring Daniel Craig
Javier Bardem
Ralph Fiennes
Naomie Harris
Bérénice Marlohe
Albert Finney
Judi Dench
Music by Thomas Newman
"Skyfall" performed
by Adele
Cinematography Roger Deakins
Editing by Stuart Baird
Studio Eon Productions
Danjaq LLC
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Columbia Pictures
Release date(s) 
23 October 2012 (London, premiere)
26 October 2012 (United Kingdom)
Running time 143 minutes[1]
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Budget $150 million
 

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